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History Lesson: Using Race to Divide and Conquer

The poor are fighting for the benefit of the wealthy… and don’t realize it. Poor white folks getting suckered again and again, standing up for ideologies that actually go against their best interest and help protect the wealthy elite. Such as folks who may be losing their extended medicaid because of the new healthcare reform. Now is no different than hundreds of years ago. Trumps administration of billionaires and actions to shrink government play right into this story. Just as did Obama and Clinton’s agendas. When will we stop blindly hiding behind politicians and start genuinely standing up for what is right?

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Asheville’s African American Community & Systemic Oppression

Keeping certain people invisible, not letting them speak for themselves, not letting them be a part of (or lead) important conversations that effect their future… This is oppression. This is racism. This is whiteness. This is white supremacy. If the words ‘whiteness’ or ‘white supremacy’ turn you off or make you feel uncomfortable, please look at how I am using them in this situation below. It is not about the color of any particular person’s skin. It is not about violent or aggressive racial slurs. It is about perpetuating histories and behaviors of oppression, subordination, marginalization and silencing that continue a narrative that keeps those with power as the ones with power and those who have been stripped of their power, continuously subordinated, disregarded, and often harmed.

NPR’s “All Things Considered” came to Asheville and hosted a panel about “what happens when a town gets hot and becomes highly attractive to outsiders.” The panel discussed how the city’s popularity “has placed a significant burden on many of the city’s oldest communities by accelerating a gentrification process that prices out older residents in favor of new and more affluent residents.” The panel acknowledged that “the communities that are most impacted by gentrification are largely African-American.” However, no one from the city’s African-American or Latino community was invited on the panel.

Screen Shot 2017-03-05 at 10.47.37 PMDarin Waters, Ph.D. points out, “As a native of this city’s African-American community, I found the absence of these voices troubling. In the case of the African-American community, this experience of exclusion from important conversations has deep historical roots. Throughout the period of slavery and Jim Crow segregation, our community was kept on the social, economic and political periphery. Only in those instances where we were willing to assume great risk were we allowed to speak for ourselves. In most instances, our lives, interests and aspirations, if it was even acknowledged that such existed, were expressed for us, and in most cases by those who were responsible for our community’s marginalization in the first place. The failure to include African-Americans in a conversation that addressed issues that impact their communities so directly only reinforces this history.”

When the audience brought attention to this issue, it was glossed over with justifications that there were people of color on the panel. As if the presence of some minority voices should be seen as representative of all minority voices.
Dr. Waters points out that “by failing to include a representative from the (Asheville) African-American community on her panel, Martin, whose show attracts a weekly listening audience of more than 13 million listeners, not only reinforced false notions about the region, but also perpetuated the sense of marginalization and invisibility that African-Americans have been combating for a long time.”

All quotes from this article, “Were All Things Considered” by Dr. Darin Waters

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The Violence of Othering

After passing through customs, I regretted not talking to the many customs workers in bullet-proof vests, shepherding us through the process. I wondered if the vests were new for them. I wondered what questions I could have asked them to feel into the humanity with which they are doing their job. So much of my sense of hope (and imagination for organizing) rests in the possibility that enough good people who hold jobs that grant them power will resist orders to act in inhumane ways. Targeting and discriminating against people because of their color or religion is not thoughtful and diligent security. It is racist and discriminatory. It is the foundation of Hitler’s regime and increasingly Trump’s regime. If that were the only way for us to insure safety for the people of this country, then there would also be a blanket discrimination against white, Christian men as there are numerous accounts of extreme acts of violence and mass shootings from white, Christian men in this country.

“It was the first time Ali Jr. and his mother have ever been asked if they’re Muslim when re-entering the United States, he said.” – Source: Muhammad Ali’s Son Detained at Airport and Was Asked ‘Are you Muslim?’

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January 31, 2017

On one hand, we are experiencing a corporate take over. A proposed Cabinet of 15 people has $4.5 billion dollars of financial worth. As Trump said, “I want people that made a fortune!” Perhaps to him, it is a game of hiring and firing people to establish a new order of business where he is the boss. This is different from political transition of power, when people with experience and expertise are appointed to do the complex job of governing a nation.

In the meantime, his closest advisors (a small group, not a large system of checks-and-balances) are helping him lead a fascist regime takeover. A shift of power towards radical authoritarian nationalism. Think Hitler.

STEP ONE for a fascist ruling is to attack the media, discredit it.
Controlling the media allows you to control information. messaging. perceptions. reality.
Steve Bannon is the chief White House strategist and was Trumps campaign chairman. It seems he may be a master at shaping perception. Prior to the White House, he was the Executive Chairman of an online media publication for white nationalists, anti-Semites and racists. He has significant experience igniting the fire in people who are fueled by hate for other people. He can stir their passion with streams of angry ideologies. He knows how to run a propaganda machine, how to control the flow of information that is used to shape perception and reality. And now, as the chief strategist, he is shaping what we believe is real or fake, truth or lies, legal or illegal. To achieve this, the first step is to isolate people from the media. The media must not be trusted as a source of truth, facts, or accurate accounts of what is happening in order to be able to control public perception.

STEP TWO for a Fascist ruling is to silence scientists and government employees.
Scientists must go because critical thinkers are a threat to authoritarian control. The administration quickly silenced  the Environmental Protection Agency and other government officials. Yesterday Trump fired the sitting Attorney General because she did not agree with him. Traditionally in the United States of America, we value something called checks and balances. Disagreement of opinions is tolerated as part of the process of determining what is the constitutional rule of law. However, in this corporate, authoritarian take-over that is no longer necessary.

This weekend Trump removed the nation’s top military and intelligence advisers from being regular attendees to the National Security Council. The Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Director of National Intelligence are no longer regular attendees of the National Security Council’s Principals Committee, the highest official group that deals with national security matters. Steve Bannon, someone who has no government, intelligence, or high-level military experience was added to the National Security Council. Two senior military positions were downgraded and an online publication editor was put in their place on matters of national security. With his permanent seat at the NSC meetings, Bannon has been elevated above the director of the CIA, Mike Pompeo, who was not offered an open invitation.

In addition, last Thursday the majority of the State Department was made to resign. These are career officials who are generally committed to the position and the State Department and who remain in their positions for at least a few months in a transition of power to insure a smooth and safe transition. Their removal now leaves the State Department entirely unstaffed during these critical first weeks when orders like the Muslim ban (which they would normally resist) are coming down.

Meanwhile, on Friday Reince Preibus, the White House Chief of Staff, released a statement for Holocaust Remembrance day (as is custom for the White House to do). In his statement, however, he failed to mention Jews as part of the list of people who are remembered from that horrific time. And then defended the choice to not include them. Friday was also the same day that the refugee ban was put into affect. Both of these actions are a wink to a White Nationalist base (remember the folks at Breitbart, the online publication that Bannon ran) who also claim that the Jewish genocide of the Holocaust was fabricated and are in favor of White Nationalist policies such as the discriminatory executive orders.

This administration is trying to create power by creating chaos. One “shock and awe” event after another. Orders that are ambiguous or ridiculous, causing people to scramble to react and protect the vulnerable. If they can throw the people into a state of chaos, if they can tire us from anxiety and fear, we are easier to control. The hope is that with one atrocity after another, people will become desensitized. We will retreat into our safety or despair bubbles. The masses will stop noticing and stop responding to abuse of power. We cannot let them wear us down. Don’t be surprised that there will be more to come. Take care of yourself. TAKE CARE OF EACH OTHER. Don’t hide. Stand up. Live love and compassion with a fierce commitment to peace and justice. Get creative in how you speak out against what is unjust and create new ways for us to govern and care for each other. Find ways to process what you are feeling and experiencing, talk to your friends and neighbors. Build bridges across differences. We need one another. We are all in this together.

WhatYouDO
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We Must Look at and Heal Poverty

Screen Shot 2017-01-17 at 9.21.25 PM“The well-off and the secure have too often become indifferent and oblivious to the poverty and deprivation in their midst. The poor in our countries have been shut out of our minds, and driven from the mainstream of our societies, because we have allowed them to become invisible. Just as nonviolence exposed the ugliness of racial injustice, so must the infection and sickness of poverty be exposed and healed – not only its symptoms but its basic causes. This, too, will be a fierce struggle, but we must not be afraid to pursue the remedy no matter how formidable the task.” ~ Martin Luther King Jr. from his Nobel lecture upon winning the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964

Transcript of the Lecture

Listen to the Lecture

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Veterans and Indigenous People: Healing & Forgiveness

Deep gratitude to all those involved in this. Please may we create many more opportunities for healing and forgiveness from the horrors of our past. Confession. Healing. Forgiveness. May we learn from our mistakes and never repeat them. May the power of our prayers and ceremonies continue to weave a new world.

“BEAUTIFUL MEDICINE AT STANDING ROCK! Where else in the world do you see this level of healing? DAPL doesn’t understand what they are trying to crush, which in a sense means they don’t understand themselves. This movement is trying to set past mistakes right to create spaces of healing. Healing historical trauma, restoring sustainability to Mother Earth, clergy denouncing the doctrine of discovery, THE PEOPLE TRYING TO forgive, heal, move forward together instead of being in denial. This movement is needed but DAPL only sees $. #NoDAPL” ~Prolific the Rapper

Beautiful photos.

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Learning About Fascism and Such

Screen Shot 2016-12-01 at 7.22.21 PMI commit to facing history and this present moment.

Here is a mix of quotes, all from articles posted at the bottom in my efforts to learn about fascism and Nixon era as relates to now.

Few Americans under the age of 50 have a grasp of fascism or the history of fascist movements in modern history. Hitler and the holocaust mesmerize the culture with horror, yet a fundamental understanding of fascist ideology is absent. The spread of fascism in the 1920s was significantly aided by the fact that liberals and mainstream conservatives failed to take it seriously. Instead, they accommodated and normalised it. Back in the 1930s, The New York Times assured its readers that Hitler’s anti-Semitism was all posture. Comfortable happiness is readily available in a fascist state.
This nation was founded as an opposite to an authoritarian monarch. We set up institutions like a free press and an independent court system to protect our fragile rights. We have survived through bloody spasms of a Civil War and a Civil Rights Movement to extend more of these rights to more of our citizens.
From the Nixon years, we know that a law-and-order president who lacks respect for the Constitution poses a critical threat to dissent. In 1969, Nixon’s vice president, Spiro Agnew, warned that TV stations broadcasting unfavorable stories could see their licenses revoked by their Federal Communications Commission or their corporate structures dismantled by the Justice Department. Now we are facing limitations on the freedom of our expression, freedom to protest, and even freedom of movement…
The national press is likely to be among the first institutional victims of Trumpism. There is no law that requires the presidential administration to hold daily briefings, none that guarantees media access to the White House. Journalism is difficult and sometimes impossible without access to information. Nixon did great damage (including the invasion of Cambodia, the killings at Jackson State and Kent State, the government infiltration and surveillance of dissenters), but the country survived. We must resist because the consequences of twenty-first century fascism are unimaginably horrific. Unlike Germany’s fascism of the 1930s, we possess today nuclear weapons, biological weapons, massive surveillance infrastructures, a gargantuan military industrial complex controlled by Dark Money, and a servile media. We have never had fascism on Earth in this context.
I believe there is a vast majority who wants to see this nation continue in tolerance and freedom. But it will require speaking. Engage in your civic government. Flood newsrooms or TV networks with your calls if you feel they are slipping into the normalization of extremism. Donate your time and money to causes that will fight to protect our liberties.
There was a flipside to the Nixon age: It produced some of the most enduring progressive organizing in the nation’s history. The Stonewall Rebellion in New York City erupted in June 1969, launching the modern-day LGBTQ movement. Less than a year later came the first Earth Day. Second-wave feminism gained traction throughout that period and produced victories like Roe v. Wade, the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion.
We are a great nation. We have survived deep challenges in our past. We can and will do so again. But we cannot be afraid to speak and act to ensure the future we want for our children and grandchildren. In order to become whole, as opposed to further divided, we must, and I mean must, create safe circles of connection and community with each other. Anyone who attempts to navigate the crisis on his/her own or just with “me and mine,” will not and cannot. If there is ever to be a majority national movement for social and economic justice, it needs to include whites who have suffered from deindustrialization, offshoring, the decline of unions, and the shrinking farm economy. At the same time, there is a lot of policy turf to defend—human rights, public education, the social safety net, the planet’s health—and those are areas where we need to redouble our grassroots efforts. We must squelch the impulse to pretend that things will be fine… moving too fast to normalize the news. And we must protect from harm those in our communities who are most vulnerable both to the Trump administration’s policies and to the violence and intimidation we’ve already seen.
Business as usual is completely over.
All of above is quotes from these articles:
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