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White Folks – Learn to Talk about Race

Edward

Jordan Edwards did everything that dominant culture tells us is good and right. He was smart, popular,and athletic.
The party got rowdy, so he left. He used sound judgement.
He was still murdered by the state.
No black body is safe. White Supremacy does not allow any black/ brown body to be safe.
Ever.
- Desiree Lynn Adaway

One of the core problems about effectively addressing race issues today is that so many white adults are years, decades behind in talking and learning about race. Many white parents shielded their kids from any critical race conversation which left us with a generation of adults who are starting from scratch in this urgent time of need.
- Phyllis Utley

Dear White People,
Because you are too afraid to have hard conversations with your children/families about race, People of Color have to teach our children how to survive you. How to tiptoe around your fear so we can keep our homes, our jobs, our lives. Look, if you’re scared to speak about these issues honestly with your kids, imagine how scary it is to live not knowing if a misunderstanding with a white person will lead to your death.
- Marsha Davis

So many emotions on so many layers of life right now… #BlackLivesMatter #JordanEdward #PleaseCanWeWakeUpAndTakeResponsibilityWhiteFolks #StopTheMurders #ProtectTheChildren #FollowTheLeadershipOfPeopleOfColor #HealingIsNecessaryForAllOfUs

These quotes are reposted with permissions from the authors.

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Fund Grassroots Organizations Lead by People of Color

“We need to shift funding decisions from which orgs write the best proposal and have the best “capacity” and start considering factors such as do at least half their board members and the majority of their senior staff come from the communities they’re serving.”

Important article about Funders’ Role in Protecting Marginalized Communities During the Next Four Years.

Some recommendations gathered from speaking to leaders from marginalized communities, especially communities of color:

  • Assess how much you’re investing in organizations led by communities of color and other marginalized communities
  • Increase your payout
  • Change your priorities around how you select which orgs get funding
  • Stop listening to the siren song of “strategic philanthropy”
  • Take risks and accept failure. And do it faster
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Addressing Institutional Racism Or Not…

Screen Shot 2017-03-26 at 12.37.03 PMI highly encourage you to read this article by Korbett Mosesly. Especially if you work at a non-profit or organization that has a majority White leadership and cares about addressing racism.
10 Ways to Practice Institutional Racism at Your Non-Profit Organization

  1. Maintain White Leadership
  2. Frame the issues & lead the strategies for people of color.
  3. Limit partnerships with (and Feedback from) communities of color.
  4. Ignore complaints of bias and racism from workers and clients.
  5. Value credentials vs. the skills needed to serve diverse populations.
  6. Do not involve people directly impacted.
  7. White wash the diversity language.
  8. Maintain the social dynamic of white non-profit affinity groups.
  9. Exploit black clients in poverty.
  10. Offer cultural competency training every few years.
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Asheville’s African American Community & Systemic Oppression

Keeping certain people invisible, not letting them speak for themselves, not letting them be a part of (or lead) important conversations that effect their future… This is oppression. This is racism. This is whiteness. This is white supremacy. If the words ‘whiteness’ or ‘white supremacy’ turn you off or make you feel uncomfortable, please look at how I am using them in this situation below. It is not about the color of any particular person’s skin. It is not about violent or aggressive racial slurs. It is about perpetuating histories and behaviors of oppression, subordination, marginalization and silencing that continue a narrative that keeps those with power as the ones with power and those who have been stripped of their power, continuously subordinated, disregarded, and often harmed.

NPR’s “All Things Considered” came to Asheville and hosted a panel about “what happens when a town gets hot and becomes highly attractive to outsiders.” The panel discussed how the city’s popularity “has placed a significant burden on many of the city’s oldest communities by accelerating a gentrification process that prices out older residents in favor of new and more affluent residents.” The panel acknowledged that “the communities that are most impacted by gentrification are largely African-American.” However, no one from the city’s African-American or Latino community was invited on the panel.

Screen Shot 2017-03-05 at 10.47.37 PMDarin Waters, Ph.D. points out, “As a native of this city’s African-American community, I found the absence of these voices troubling. In the case of the African-American community, this experience of exclusion from important conversations has deep historical roots. Throughout the period of slavery and Jim Crow segregation, our community was kept on the social, economic and political periphery. Only in those instances where we were willing to assume great risk were we allowed to speak for ourselves. In most instances, our lives, interests and aspirations, if it was even acknowledged that such existed, were expressed for us, and in most cases by those who were responsible for our community’s marginalization in the first place. The failure to include African-Americans in a conversation that addressed issues that impact their communities so directly only reinforces this history.”

When the audience brought attention to this issue, it was glossed over with justifications that there were people of color on the panel. As if the presence of some minority voices should be seen as representative of all minority voices.
Dr. Waters points out that “by failing to include a representative from the (Asheville) African-American community on her panel, Martin, whose show attracts a weekly listening audience of more than 13 million listeners, not only reinforced false notions about the region, but also perpetuated the sense of marginalization and invisibility that African-Americans have been combating for a long time.”

All quotes from this article, “Were All Things Considered” by Dr. Darin Waters

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Love, Justice and Compassion is What We Are Uniting Around

Listen to Linda Sarsour speak truth.

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Money Has Power

MONEY is a huge factor in this fascist state we are quickly shifting into and a powerful component of successful strategies. The majority of the players in power are invested in making money and the majority of the players on the ground cultivating freedom and justice are in need of money. ACTION involves making choices to NOT SPEND MONEY in places that are supporting these unjust policies AND GIVING MONEY to grassroots organizations that are leading the way to a future that works for all. When NYC taxi drivers at JFK went on strike in protest of the ban, Uber lowered its airport ride prices to break the strike. Do you enjoy the ease and convenience of Uber? Would you give it up and stand behind taxi drivers that were making a statement for a greater good? Encourage LYFT’s decision to donate $1 million to ACLU? (Article about Deleting Uber as a boycott)

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Womens March on Washington

WomensMarchQuite an inspiring platform for the Women’s March on Washington on Saturday. It’s been reported that over 200,000 women are planning to attend in Washington and marches are also happening all around the country/world. Read the full document. Understand the complexity of what people are standing up for. Revealing our numbers is just the beginning… then we continue to work together to make these principles a reality. Together we are capable of so much.

  • Womens2Women’s Rights are Human Rights and Human Rights are Women’s Rights.
  • Gender Justice is Racial Justice is Economic Justice.
  • Women deserve to live full and healthy lives, free of violence against our bodies.
  • We believe in accountability and justice for police brutality and ending racial profiling and targeting of communities of color.
  • It is our moral imperative to dismantle the gender and racial inequities within the criminal justice system.
  • We do not accept any federal, state or local rollbacks, cuts or restrictions on our ability to access quality reproductive healthcare services, birth control, HIV/AIDS care and prevention, or medically accurate sexuality education.
  • We must have the power to control our bodies and be free from gender norms, expectations and stereotypes.
  • We firmly declare that LGBTQIA Rights are Human Rights and that it is our obligation to uplift, expand and protect the rights of our gay, lesbian, bi, queer, trans or gender non-conforming brothers, sisters and siblings.
  • We believe in an economy powered by transparency, accountability, security and equity. We believe that creating workforce opportunities that reduce discrimination against women and mothers allow economies to thrive.
  • We believe in equal pay for equal work and the right of all women to be paid equitably
  • We recognize that women of color carry the heaviest burden in the global and domestic economic landscape, particularly in the care economy. We further affirm that all care work–caring for the elderly, caring for the chronically ill, caring for children and supporting independence for people with disabilities–is work, and that the burden of care falls disproportionately on the shoulders of women, particularly women of color. We stand for the rights, dignity, and fair treatment of all unpaid and paid caregivers.
  • We believe that all workers – including domestic and farm workers – must have the right to organize and fight for a living minimum wage, and that unions and other labor associations are critical to a healthy and thriving economy for all.
  • We believe Civil Rights are our birthright. Our Constitutional government establishes a framework to provide and expand rights and freedoms–not restrict them. To this end, we must protect and restore all the Constitutionally-mandated rights to all our citizens, including voting rights, freedom to worship without fear of intimidation or harassment, freedom of speech, and protections for all citizens regardless of race, gender, age or disability.
  • We believe it is time for an all-inclusive Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
  • We believe in immigrant and refugee rights regardless of status or country of origin. It is our moral duty to keep families together and empower all aspiring Americans to fully participate in, and contribute to, our economy and society. We reject mass deportation, family detention, violations of due process and violence against queer and trans migrants
  • We believe that every person and every community in our nation has the right to clean water, clean air, and access to and enjoyment of public lands.

wethepeople3

 

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