Archive | social justice RSS feed for this section

Addressing Institutional Racism Or Not…

Screen Shot 2017-03-26 at 12.37.03 PMI highly encourage you to read this article by Korbett Mosesly. Especially if you work at a non-profit or organization that has a majority White leadership and cares about addressing racism.
10 Ways to Practice Institutional Racism at Your Non-Profit Organization

  1. Maintain White Leadership
  2. Frame the issues & lead the strategies for people of color.
  3. Limit partnerships with (and Feedback from) communities of color.
  4. Ignore complaints of bias and racism from workers and clients.
  5. Value credentials vs. the skills needed to serve diverse populations.
  6. Do not involve people directly impacted.
  7. White wash the diversity language.
  8. Maintain the social dynamic of white non-profit affinity groups.
  9. Exploit black clients in poverty.
  10. Offer cultural competency training every few years.
Read full story Comments { 0 }

Asheville’s African American Community & Systemic Oppression

Keeping certain people invisible, not letting them speak for themselves, not letting them be a part of (or lead) important conversations that effect their future… This is oppression. This is racism. This is whiteness. This is white supremacy. If the words ‘whiteness’ or ‘white supremacy’ turn you off or make you feel uncomfortable, please look at how I am using them in this situation below. It is not about the color of any particular person’s skin. It is not about violent or aggressive racial slurs. It is about perpetuating histories and behaviors of oppression, subordination, marginalization and silencing that continue a narrative that keeps those with power as the ones with power and those who have been stripped of their power, continuously subordinated, disregarded, and often harmed.

NPR’s “All Things Considered” came to Asheville and hosted a panel about “what happens when a town gets hot and becomes highly attractive to outsiders.” The panel discussed how the city’s popularity “has placed a significant burden on many of the city’s oldest communities by accelerating a gentrification process that prices out older residents in favor of new and more affluent residents.” The panel acknowledged that “the communities that are most impacted by gentrification are largely African-American.” However, no one from the city’s African-American or Latino community was invited on the panel.

Screen Shot 2017-03-05 at 10.47.37 PMDarin Waters, Ph.D. points out, “As a native of this city’s African-American community, I found the absence of these voices troubling. In the case of the African-American community, this experience of exclusion from important conversations has deep historical roots. Throughout the period of slavery and Jim Crow segregation, our community was kept on the social, economic and political periphery. Only in those instances where we were willing to assume great risk were we allowed to speak for ourselves. In most instances, our lives, interests and aspirations, if it was even acknowledged that such existed, were expressed for us, and in most cases by those who were responsible for our community’s marginalization in the first place. The failure to include African-Americans in a conversation that addressed issues that impact their communities so directly only reinforces this history.”

When the audience brought attention to this issue, it was glossed over with justifications that there were people of color on the panel. As if the presence of some minority voices should be seen as representative of all minority voices.
Dr. Waters points out that “by failing to include a representative from the (Asheville) African-American community on her panel, Martin, whose show attracts a weekly listening audience of more than 13 million listeners, not only reinforced false notions about the region, but also perpetuated the sense of marginalization and invisibility that African-Americans have been combating for a long time.”

All quotes from this article, “Were All Things Considered” by Dr. Darin Waters

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Love, Justice and Compassion is What We Are Uniting Around

Listen to Linda Sarsour speak truth.

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Money Has Power

MONEY is a huge factor in this fascist state we are quickly shifting into and a powerful component of successful strategies. The majority of the players in power are invested in making money and the majority of the players on the ground cultivating freedom and justice are in need of money. ACTION involves making choices to NOT SPEND MONEY in places that are supporting these unjust policies AND GIVING MONEY to grassroots organizations that are leading the way to a future that works for all. When NYC taxi drivers at JFK went on strike in protest of the ban, Uber lowered its airport ride prices to break the strike. Do you enjoy the ease and convenience of Uber? Would you give it up and stand behind taxi drivers that were making a statement for a greater good? Encourage LYFT’s decision to donate $1 million to ACLU? (Article about Deleting Uber as a boycott)

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Womens March on Washington

WomensMarchQuite an inspiring platform for the Women’s March on Washington on Saturday. It’s been reported that over 200,000 women are planning to attend in Washington and marches are also happening all around the country/world. Read the full document. Understand the complexity of what people are standing up for. Revealing our numbers is just the beginning… then we continue to work together to make these principles a reality. Together we are capable of so much.

  • Womens2Women’s Rights are Human Rights and Human Rights are Women’s Rights.
  • Gender Justice is Racial Justice is Economic Justice.
  • Women deserve to live full and healthy lives, free of violence against our bodies.
  • We believe in accountability and justice for police brutality and ending racial profiling and targeting of communities of color.
  • It is our moral imperative to dismantle the gender and racial inequities within the criminal justice system.
  • We do not accept any federal, state or local rollbacks, cuts or restrictions on our ability to access quality reproductive healthcare services, birth control, HIV/AIDS care and prevention, or medically accurate sexuality education.
  • We must have the power to control our bodies and be free from gender norms, expectations and stereotypes.
  • We firmly declare that LGBTQIA Rights are Human Rights and that it is our obligation to uplift, expand and protect the rights of our gay, lesbian, bi, queer, trans or gender non-conforming brothers, sisters and siblings.
  • We believe in an economy powered by transparency, accountability, security and equity. We believe that creating workforce opportunities that reduce discrimination against women and mothers allow economies to thrive.
  • We believe in equal pay for equal work and the right of all women to be paid equitably
  • We recognize that women of color carry the heaviest burden in the global and domestic economic landscape, particularly in the care economy. We further affirm that all care work–caring for the elderly, caring for the chronically ill, caring for children and supporting independence for people with disabilities–is work, and that the burden of care falls disproportionately on the shoulders of women, particularly women of color. We stand for the rights, dignity, and fair treatment of all unpaid and paid caregivers.
  • We believe that all workers – including domestic and farm workers – must have the right to organize and fight for a living minimum wage, and that unions and other labor associations are critical to a healthy and thriving economy for all.
  • We believe Civil Rights are our birthright. Our Constitutional government establishes a framework to provide and expand rights and freedoms–not restrict them. To this end, we must protect and restore all the Constitutionally-mandated rights to all our citizens, including voting rights, freedom to worship without fear of intimidation or harassment, freedom of speech, and protections for all citizens regardless of race, gender, age or disability.
  • We believe it is time for an all-inclusive Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
  • We believe in immigrant and refugee rights regardless of status or country of origin. It is our moral duty to keep families together and empower all aspiring Americans to fully participate in, and contribute to, our economy and society. We reject mass deportation, family detention, violations of due process and violence against queer and trans migrants
  • We believe that every person and every community in our nation has the right to clean water, clean air, and access to and enjoyment of public lands.

wethepeople3

 

Read full story Comments { 0 }

May I Be a Worthy Servant

This past year I have written more online. I have used social media to ask the questions my heart ponders or frets over, share the news that crosses my path, and to articulate the ways I make meaning of the world around me. The responses from people reading my words have helped me see more clearly some of the ways I embody elements that Chani Nicholas speaks to in the Virgo call to service below. I am honored to be alive in this way and to show up and serve. Thank you for being on this journey with me. I always welcome feedback about ways I do below that are helpful/effective or not. May we amaze ourselves in the days to come as we recreate ourselves…

“You are our beloved nerd. Our expert. Our sincere seeker of the facts. The one who will ask the right questions. The one who can separate the truth from the rest of the information. You are discerning, unfazed by pomp and circumstance. You seek to understand the systems of nature we live within, looking for the beautiful, naturally occurring alchemy that uses every aspect of creation to recreate itself. You know nature’s efficiency. You know how to value the clean machine that is our earth. You know how to value the wisdom of the body. You teach us all manner of natural remedies. You know how to locate and remove what is unnecessary, toxic or ill-fitting. You know what is wrong with a thing because you know how to think critically about it and everything else.

This year we will need your compassionate critique. We will need your analysis. We will need your natural talent to deconstruct the ill-formed theories that have no place in a fair and just world. You are no fool and this year will have no shortage of foolish ideas. Bless us with your ability to cut them down to size with nothing but logic.

We need you to remind us that success isn’t about the applause we receive but about the quality of work we are able to produce in service of something greater than ourselves. You work for the sake of the work. You know what it is to be humble. To be wrong. To be worried about getting it done well. Help us to be thoughtful, concerned, hard-working citizens. Help us to remember that we will make mistakes so we might as well become dedicated students to the wisdom we most wish to embody.

In exchange, we will calm you when you feel like you need to fix everything. This situation is beyond broken. It is not your responsibility alone to figure out the whole mess. The future needs us all.”

 

Read full story Comments { 0 }

We Must Look at and Heal Poverty

Screen Shot 2017-01-17 at 9.21.25 PM“The well-off and the secure have too often become indifferent and oblivious to the poverty and deprivation in their midst. The poor in our countries have been shut out of our minds, and driven from the mainstream of our societies, because we have allowed them to become invisible. Just as nonviolence exposed the ugliness of racial injustice, so must the infection and sickness of poverty be exposed and healed – not only its symptoms but its basic causes. This, too, will be a fierce struggle, but we must not be afraid to pursue the remedy no matter how formidable the task.” ~ Martin Luther King Jr. from his Nobel lecture upon winning the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964

Transcript of the Lecture

Listen to the Lecture

Read full story Comments { 0 }