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White Supremacy is a Racial Hierarchy

 


WS1

Quotes from Desiree Adaway:

“White supremacy refers to a racial hierarchy in which whiteness sits at the very tippy top. This country was founded and built upon this system—legally, culturally, economically, and politically—of white male upper class supremacy. We want to believe that it only reflects extreme images of terrorist organizations like KKK members or the modern day Nazi movement.

  • This hierarchy manifests itself legally when the government finally admits that the war on drugs was created to bring down leaders and destroy communities of color- so they created sentencing guidelines to support this narrative.
  • This hierarchy manifests itself culturally through internal bias, assumptions and norms that teaches Black cultural is “bad” and white cultural is “good’. A black boy in a hoodie is a thug but a white boy in a hoodie is the next Mark Zuckerberg.
  • This hierarchy manifests itself economically by maintaining class inequalities by determining which neighborhoods are “good” or “bad” and determining which of these communities have access to housing loans and capital.
  • This hierarchy manifests politically when every President but one in our history has been white, male and upper-class. 

The word “racism” waters down this structural reality. Let’s call a thang, a thang. So call it what it is- white supremacy”

….

“Fear of onflict helps keep the status quo. The need to equate raising a difficult issue like white supremacy with being impolite or rude or out of line helps keep white supremacy securely in place. When people on the margins don’t speak in a language or tone that the dominant group finds acceptable they use that as an excuse to not address the issue at all. You have been fed the lie that you have the right to emotional and psychological comfort over my freedom from an oppressive system.”

WS2

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Segregated Schools and Inequality in Funding Is Destroying Us

Screen Shot 2017-03-26 at 12.30.14 PMFrom The Conversation I’m Tired of Not Having by 2016 National Teacher of the Year Finalist

“As a nation, we’re nibbling around the edges with accountability measures and other reforms, but we’re ignoring the immutable core issue: much of white and wealthy America is perfectly happy with segregated schools and inequity in funding. We have the schools we have, because people who can afford better get better. And sadly, people who can’t afford better just get less–less experienced teachers, inadequate funding and inferior facilities.

Middle class America would never allow the conditions that have become normalized in poor and brown America to stand for their kids.

The images coming out of Detroit Public Schools: buckled floors, toilets without seats, roaches, mold and even mushrooms growing in damp, disgusting, mildewy classrooms. Like the images of American torture and abuse last decade in Abu Ghraib, these images should have shocked the nation. Instead, they elicited a collective national shrug, stretch and yawn.

The View from the Burbs is Sweet. Through white flight and suburbanization, wealthy and middle class families have completely insulated themselves from educational inequality. They send their kids to homogeneous schools and they do what it takes, politically at the local level, to ensure they’re well-funded, well-staffed, with opportunities for enrichment and exploration.

I spoke to a veteran teacher (17 years in the classroom) from Maryland. Her school is located five miles from the nation’s capitol and in her career, she has never taught a white student. Never. Her county and its schools are completely segregated. We aren’t in this together.

“61% of Blacks, 55% of Hispanics support gov’t intervention to address school segregation. Vast majority of whites (72%) say nope!” They’re perfectly satisfied with situation as is.

Our most needy students need our best teachers, yet our highest need schools have the least experienced teachers, the most turnover and are becoming burnout factories for those who remain. All the existing structural incentives for effective educators push them toward work in suburban schools, where they’ll be better supported and the workload is sustainable. Nobody wants to talk about this.”

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Black Pride is Powerful & Beautiful


This powerful video was made by students at Asheville High School last month. Its byline is “spread love – not only this month, every month. to everyone.”

The students wanted to show it at a school assembly to celebrate Black History Month. They were told they couldn’t because there was too much black power expressed in the video.

#ProBlackIsNotAntiWhite #BlackPrideShouldNotBeControversial #NarrativesMatter #ListenToYoungPeople #TheyKnow

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History Lesson: Using Race to Divide and Conquer

The poor are fighting for the benefit of the wealthy… and don’t realize it. Poor white folks getting suckered again and again, standing up for ideologies that actually go against their best interest and help protect the wealthy elite. Such as folks who may be losing their extended medicaid because of the new healthcare reform. Now is no different than hundreds of years ago. Trumps administration of billionaires and actions to shrink government play right into this story. Just as did Obama and Clinton’s agendas. When will we stop blindly hiding behind politicians and start genuinely standing up for what is right?

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Asheville’s African American Community & Systemic Oppression

Keeping certain people invisible, not letting them speak for themselves, not letting them be a part of (or lead) important conversations that effect their future… This is oppression. This is racism. This is whiteness. This is white supremacy. If the words ‘whiteness’ or ‘white supremacy’ turn you off or make you feel uncomfortable, please look at how I am using them in this situation below. It is not about the color of any particular person’s skin. It is not about violent or aggressive racial slurs. It is about perpetuating histories and behaviors of oppression, subordination, marginalization and silencing that continue a narrative that keeps those with power as the ones with power and those who have been stripped of their power, continuously subordinated, disregarded, and often harmed.

NPR’s “All Things Considered” came to Asheville and hosted a panel about “what happens when a town gets hot and becomes highly attractive to outsiders.” The panel discussed how the city’s popularity “has placed a significant burden on many of the city’s oldest communities by accelerating a gentrification process that prices out older residents in favor of new and more affluent residents.” The panel acknowledged that “the communities that are most impacted by gentrification are largely African-American.” However, no one from the city’s African-American or Latino community was invited on the panel.

Screen Shot 2017-03-05 at 10.47.37 PMDarin Waters, Ph.D. points out, “As a native of this city’s African-American community, I found the absence of these voices troubling. In the case of the African-American community, this experience of exclusion from important conversations has deep historical roots. Throughout the period of slavery and Jim Crow segregation, our community was kept on the social, economic and political periphery. Only in those instances where we were willing to assume great risk were we allowed to speak for ourselves. In most instances, our lives, interests and aspirations, if it was even acknowledged that such existed, were expressed for us, and in most cases by those who were responsible for our community’s marginalization in the first place. The failure to include African-Americans in a conversation that addressed issues that impact their communities so directly only reinforces this history.”

When the audience brought attention to this issue, it was glossed over with justifications that there were people of color on the panel. As if the presence of some minority voices should be seen as representative of all minority voices.
Dr. Waters points out that “by failing to include a representative from the (Asheville) African-American community on her panel, Martin, whose show attracts a weekly listening audience of more than 13 million listeners, not only reinforced false notions about the region, but also perpetuated the sense of marginalization and invisibility that African-Americans have been combating for a long time.”

All quotes from this article, “Were All Things Considered” by Dr. Darin Waters

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The Violence of Othering

After passing through customs, I regretted not talking to the many customs workers in bullet-proof vests, shepherding us through the process. I wondered if the vests were new for them. I wondered what questions I could have asked them to feel into the humanity with which they are doing their job. So much of my sense of hope (and imagination for organizing) rests in the possibility that enough good people who hold jobs that grant them power will resist orders to act in inhumane ways. Targeting and discriminating against people because of their color or religion is not thoughtful and diligent security. It is racist and discriminatory. It is the foundation of Hitler’s regime and increasingly Trump’s regime. If that were the only way for us to insure safety for the people of this country, then there would also be a blanket discrimination against white, Christian men as there are numerous accounts of extreme acts of violence and mass shootings from white, Christian men in this country.

“It was the first time Ali Jr. and his mother have ever been asked if they’re Muslim when re-entering the United States, he said.” – Source: Muhammad Ali’s Son Detained at Airport and Was Asked ‘Are you Muslim?’

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Learn the Full History

Screen Shot 2017-02-05 at 12.09.39 PM

Unfortunately in the U.S. we are not often taught the brilliance of people of African decent in our schools and text books. Do you know the inventors and scientists who are responsible for micro processing chips, telephones and railway trains, chemotherapy, digital cellular networks, traffic lights and gas masks, programmable remote control, laser eye probe surgery, microphone, handheld computers, fiber optics, and so much more? To truly be educated (and not miseducated) we have to take learning and history into our own hands. If you’re a parent, make sure your children are learning this history.

Visit Black Miracles and Purpose Publishing for more posters, t-shirts and resources for and about Black inventors and scientists.

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